inairent

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The Bible has flaws. They are on every page. And I can prove it.

How does this statement make you feel? Nervous? Angry? Defensive?

Is that because you were taught that the Bible is the infallible, inerrant, authoritative Word of God? Is it because you’re not a Bible scholar or language expert, and couldn’t possibly make a substantial argument against it? Is it because the Bible is the bedrock of everything you believe, and if the Bible is full of holes, your faith might sink along with it?

No more Creation. No more flood. No more Jesus. No more heaven.   

What if you got a letter from a foreign friend about a childhood encounter with God? She misspelled a few English words, but that’s to be expected. She also repeated a line by accident. Probably tired. Some of her memory seems fuzzy, but the general details of the story and the point comes across.

Would you throw out the letter because of these flaws? Of course not. Transmission flaws are a natural part of the human experience, especially when time and culture are involved. And the letter still makes sense.

But what if you believed that the letter was inspired by God? Would you still be comfortable with it? Or, even scarier, what if you believed that the letter was actually written by God?

No one really thinks that the Biblical authors sat down with quill and parchment, blacked out, then woke up a few hours later to read what God wrote through their puppet bodies. No one actually thinks that the Holy Spirit possessed their human authors. At least I hope not.

Let me assure you, the work of the Biblical scribes is the least of our concerns.

Even if the text was perfect, read in the original languages, our contemporary American brains could not help but tweak the information as it passes through our unique neural networks. There is just too much cultural dissonance. And we’re not computers.

What about the interpretation of our favorite pastors and Christian authors? We put so much stock in the opinion of people like CS Lewis, Tim Keller and John Piper. Are we worried about their human flaws? Don’t they have pews to fill and books to sell?

What about all the different English translations of the Bible? We choose the one we prefer, rarely asking how reliable it is, feeling very little anxiety about the variances between them. Sometimes we even choose a translation that best fits our point of view without a single hesitation. Others stick with whatever translation they believe is closest to the original Greek or Hebrew.

Here comes a scary statement: there is no such thing as an “original” text of the Bible. We just don’t have one.

In fact, there is a whole profession in biblical studies called Textual Criticism. The job of these scholars is to take all the variant texts of the Bible and try to Sherlock Holmes their way back to the most original reading possible.

Passing down the Old Testament:  

This morning I spent a half hour working through five verses of the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. Or, as cool people call it, the BHS. Some call it the Masoretic Text. This is the Hebrew Scripture that is used for most of our current English translations.

Take a look at the first page:

BHS

You’ll notice the tiny notes on the left side of the page and the bottom. These are scribal notes, helping translators to get past any speed bumps as they work through the Hebrew text. Jewish scribes made the marks on the left, taking note of the frequency of certain words, or clarifying errors in spelling or accenting. The notes at the bottom of the page are collected from textual critics throughout the centuries, using shorthand Greek, Latin and Hebrew to mention how other translations dealt with a troublesome word or phrase.

The story of how the OT was written and passed on is fascinating and worth your time. But in the interest of word count, I’ll simply mention that around 500 AD a group of Jewish scholars called the Masoretes made it their mission to collect all of the various copies of the Hebrew Bible and come up with a definitive version. They worked with the passion, humility and care of people that had been given a divine task, and their 500-year effort yielded a text that has essentially been sealed in wax until today.

If you’re worried about the reliability of such an ancient text, let the Dead Sea Scrolls put your mind at ease. In 1946 a Bedouin shepherd threw a rock in a cave, heard the crunch of a clay jar, and the world discovered an Old Testament text that predated their earliest copies by a thousand years.

What did we learn? The Old Testament that we have today is extremely close to the text that Jesus and his apostles used in the first century.

Passing down the New Testament:

My last post mentioned a New Testament scholar named Bart Ehrman, a man who lost his fundamentalist faith when he poked his head behind the curtain of academia and saw the wizard. Today he is one of the most published and recognized scholars in New Testament studies. My academic dean gave me a sample of his recent college textbook. Here are some excerpts from the second chapter:

Throughout the Middle Ages, scribes did not realize just how different the manuscripts they were copying were from one another. It was not until 1707 that scholars began to realize the enormity of the problem. . . . Based on his thirty years of study, Oxford scholar, John Mill, cited some 30,000 places where there were differences among the manuscripts. . . . Today we have nearly fifty-seven times as many manuscripts as Mill had. The differences that we now know number in the hundreds of thousands. . . . The vast majority of these differences are completely unimportant and immaterial, but it is also important to know that some of these differences are extremely important, affecting how significant passages—or even entire books—are interpreted.   

Again, let me put your mind at ease. Though Ehrman is absolutely correct about the variant texts, having been passed through many cultures over many centuries without the convenience of Xerox, the message of the New Testament cannot be dismantled so easily.

Let’s say we were able to fix all the small errors—misspellings, mistranslations, repeated words, deleted words, and all that—and focus on the larger passages. Scholars would agree that the original Gospel of Mark ended at 16:8 with the words, “. . . for they were afraid.” Apparently future scribes were not thrilled about that ending. Like the engineers of Jurassic Park, they synthesized other biblical material to create a more suitable ending.

Be honest, does this verse sound more like a first century author or a medieval scribe? “These signs will accompany those who believe . . . they will pick up serpents, and if they drink any deadly poison, it shall not hurt them . . .” Lifting snakes? Drinking poison? Okay Quasimodo.

Quasi

The story of the the woman caught in adultery is also problematic. Translating through John, I came to chapter eight and stopped. Suddenly the words were different, the style had changed, it was harder to translate. Obviously my Greek skills were not up to an author that did not start his career as a fisherman.

Come to find out, this story doesn’t show up in the book of John until about the ninth century, 700 years after the original.

So what if we throw out the end of Mark and the story of Jesus drawing in the dirt? Do we lose Jesus? Do we lose the Gospel? What have we really lost? Only our faith in the integrity of the book, not in the integrity of the message. The same holds true for any other addition or subtraction I have come across.

I’ll be honest. When I first learned about these things, I was nervous. But the more I study, the more I translate, the more amazed I am at the cohesive message of the Bible. From Genesis to Revelation, the story arc holds together on so many levels. The deeper I go, the more profound it gets. Beneath all the divots and potholes of human fumbling is a bedrock that is grounded in a person, not a perfect text.

If God wanted his book to be perfect, he would have found himself a Joseph Smith or a Muhammad to write it down. Instead, he inspired an organic process, using many authors over many centuries from many cultures, to record and transmit their revelations and thoughts and observations, chronicling the events of a real relationship between an eternal, inerrant God and millions of finite, fragile human beings.

Apparently, he’s not threatened by human freedom. And we shouldn’t be either.

18 thoughts on “inairent

  1. To clarify, you meant Joseph Smith/Muhammad to mean, singular prophets writing down their “divine” revelations vs. so very many Biblical authors and prophets that the Bible is made up of, written works that together form one message.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey Ryan,

      I think the word “inerrancy” is trouble in itself, considering the fact that the Bible never claims to be inerrant (and the fact that it is full of errors). This document uses the word to mean “truthfulness” (Article 13) in conjunction with the biblical concept of inspiration (Article 15), but . . . why use a confusing term?

      I can get on board with “true.” I cannot get on board with “inerrant.”

      Which council or bishop officially attached this adjective to the Scriptures? Like this conference affirms in Article 2, the authority of the Church is subordinate to the authority of Scripture. And Scripture claims inspiration, not inerrancy.

      I actually studied this document back in 2011 when I was wrestling with this concept. Despite what you might think, I agree with most of it. I absolutely believe the Scriptures to be inspired and administered by the work of the Holy Spirit through human writers. And I believe that it has been preserved by God, and used in powerful ways throughout history. It has an authority that no other book has.

      However, I feel that this council has pushed beyond the witness of the text itself into the error of the Pharisees. Remember, Jesus got on the Pharisees case for making the Scriptures more than it was meant to be, more than a witness to the truth. I think we make a similar mistake in the Church today.

      In this document’s summary of inerrancy and infallability, they admit that there are mistakes and inconsistencies that are mysterious to them, but they claim that the challenges that cannot be explained away by considering things like progressive revelation, genre, culture and common transmission issues should be subjected to the reality that God’s word cannot fail.

      I agree that we should trust the overall message of the Biblical text, especially the direct revelation of God through the prophets and most especially his Son. But that doesn’t mean we should immediately embrace the last 12 verses of Mark.

      Paul himself differentiated between a direct message from Christ and his own opinion.

      “But to the rest I say, not the Lord, that if any brother has a wife who is an unbeliever, and she consents to live with him, let him not send her away.” Not the Lord?! I Cor. 7:12

      “Now concerning virgins I have no command of the Lord, but I give an opinion as one who by the mercy of the Lord is trustworthy.” I Cor. 7:25

      Statements like this do not shake my confidence in Scripture. I am not superstitious. Paul had experienced Christ and understood Christ in a way that I am eager to understand and experience. And I believe that God wanted his witness to encourage people in the truth throughout history. But I would never say that God wrote I Corinthians. He didn’t. Paul did. And that distinction is critical.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. The Quasimodo pic….nice.

    Can you please explain the title…. I think maybe you’re trying to be ironic but I’m not smart enough to get it.

    I’m having to deal with this whole inerrancy thing with a certain “Ex” who, for reasons that make sense, has dismissed most of the bible as wrong and hangs his arguments (or so he says) on the minor issues…of course we all know the “real” reasons why he is changing God’s Holy Word….

    nice read. Interesting. Thanks. When did you get so smart? what happened to that goofy guy I used to sit next to in Band? 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sarah! I always like seeing you on here.

      I’m glad you asked about the title. I wanted to be ironic about misspelling the word “inerrant” while showing that it really didn’t matter. Despite the error, you understand the word, and that is the important thing. Make sense? If I told my daughter to write a note to Laurie for me, she might make some errors in spelling or punctuation, but my message will get across.

      I think many people are using this inerrancy thing as an excuse to pull the ejection seat on Christianity. Sadly, most Christians don’t study the issues, assuming everything is neat and tidy, so they don’t have a very solid answer to the challenges of skeptics.

      Wait . . . are you saying I can’t be goofy and smart at the same time??

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  5. Hi Mr. Barnts,

    Just discovered your blog a week and half ago, and slowly reading through your posts. Great stuff. Thank you for being willing to tackle hard things and not remain in a bubble. This post really resonates with me because it is the very reason that I came to be saved.

    I had grown up in the church, but it was only after getting out of college the Lord really got to me and I was really saved. The problem that caused me to step away from the church was I felt that there were too many weird, confusing, contradicting things in scripture that I could not make sense of. Whenever I asked pastors, leaders, Bible Study teachers, etc. certain questions they would always get mad or just say we will never know until heaven.

    Now, I fully acknowledge looking back, I could have been more patient and kind, but what bothered me was:

    1. Why are the people who I thought had all the answers stumped to the point they feel I am fundamentally attacking them?

    2. How do I know heaven or God is real. I can’t seem to prove it using the Scripture people tell me is divine, so how do I ask a Being in a place that I don’t even knows exists. Plus how do I know I am saved? Is just literally praying a 30 second prayer enough when I don’t feel any different? And if I am not, I am never getting to heaven to ask Him anyways. Plus what if these questions I have are critical to salvation. Than I am really doomed!

    Fast forward about 8 years after getting out of high school and college. After living like a demon, it was when I had to face the conviction. But those nagging mental problems still existed from when I was young. But it was actually once I accepted the inerrancy or, at the risk of being called a heretic, the corruption that is in the Bible that I came to believe on Christ. Because I ,now, know it was truly the Holy Spirit that helped me with this because while it is muddled in a bunch of confusion, Scripture testifies against itself that:

    1. Trans-scribal problems exist. And in some cases outright forgeries and lies exist as well. ( I realize this is a strong accusation, but please bare in mind that I became saved because of this. So, no, I not trying speak heresy, nor undermine anyones’ faith).

    2. That some of these problems were not accidents, but very deliberate attempts destroy the truth.

    3. This veiling of the truth accounts for 100% all the confusion that I and many others in the church deal with. As well as why many people who are not believers in Christ think Christianity is flawed. I formerly being one of these people.

    4. Problem was I and many non-believers were/are attacking a “strawman” that was deliberately put there by those who sought to corrupt scripture in order justify their own sin. But they didn’t do a very good job because too much contradictions exist in scripture hinting that something is amiss.

    5. But scripture also shows how to unlock these problems in a way that makes consistent and logical sense. Revealing that from cover to cover, God has been saying the same thing since time first began to when it will end. He has never changed the point and as a result, by following the scripture the Holy Spirit helped me to come to the conclusion:

    Salvation is by grace alone. Not because salvation cannot be earned, but because all of us have fallen way short of how to earn it. And I do not mean by keeping the Levitical Law. Instead God’s true commandments are infinitely higher in what they call us to do than what the book of Leviticus records. And ironically it is much simpler and way less complicated being only made up of just those necessary things for eternal life. As the Eternal Covenant is all encompassing and fulfillment of every possible situation can be extrapolated from just a few fundamental core concepts.
    The Levitical Law, as we have it today, being the exact opposite of this approach.

    Up until the moment I got saved. I saw doing things God’s way as a big old chore and an annoying burden. Until I realized that if we all did follow His true commandments, the world would truly be perfect and that this is what He intended. But, the reason why our world was not perfect was because we did not follow His way, hence the guilt of the evil in the world is ours not His as He has given us a choice in His love and we have abused His love by destroying the birthright that is this world. Furthermore, He warned us in advance, of this very consequence if we did not abide in His Law. I had come to the logical and emotional realization that through my “IGNORANCE” of God, that I had broken every single one of His true commandments all while believing: “While I am not perfect, I wasn’t THAaaaaat bad.” But, in this moment, I understood that I claimed I wanted world peace (as anyone would) but breaking God’s will was actively working against true peace thereby being an enemy of God and His saints. And in fact that I was a very horrid person. In that moment a switch happened in my heart and my mind where I “wanted” to keep His true commandments. Then Christ’s words became clear: “TAKE My YOKE upon you, for My yoke is equal and my burden light, IF you WILL TO BEAR IT.”

    It is the very same reason that, for many, it is easier to wait 5 hours in a line at disneyland to ride on 20 second ride or camp in front of the Apple Store for 3 days in anticipation of the newest iphone when we can’t be bothered to wait at the DMV for 1 hour to take a driving test. For all intends and purposes, the disneyland waiting and the camping in front of the Apple Store is more difficult in terms of time, but it is perceived to be easier because we WILL TO BEAR IT.
    The 1 hour at the DMV is shorter, but we do not will to do it, hence why it is much more annoying, difficult, feels like a chore, and we all get into a sour mood, EVEN THOUGH WE KNOW WE NEED TO DO IT FOR THE GOOD OF OTHERS IN SOCIETY – to be a certified legal driver – AND OUR OWN GOOD ASWELL.

    The thing I praise God most for how patient He was with me all these years. I really wish I had come to some sense and been saved earlier as I would not be in the mess of the life I am in now (I reaped what I sewed and it is just for me to be in this situation). I thank God though that in His perfect time He will make things work out.

    Also, really happy that God has helped me not to be afraid of tackling this issue of inerrancy as the truth from the lie is quite clear now. The whole: “woe unto you who call evil good and good evil”.

    Before I felt like a money changer being handed two coins that looked for all intents and purposes the same superficially. Upon closer examination I notice that one has an extra line on it. Problem was without the reference of the original mint, I could not tell which coin was real and which one fake. Or if they were both real and the one with the extra mark was an acceptable mistake from the minting. Or if they were both false and that some other coin that I did not have was right. And even if somehow I knew that one was real and the other fake, without any reference point, I could easily believe that the real one was the false coin only based on my own perceptions, feelings, or life experience and still objectively be completely wrong. The only way to know is for me to have the original mint and intimate knowledge of it, then could I discern the truth from the lie.

    This is how I, personally, believe scripture has been messed with. As a result anybody with any belief, agenda, or idea can search scripture and find quite a bit of material that seems to confirm and justify whatever it is they want to believe, but that does not mean it is the truth! But when one knows the truth, even if one cannot provide evidence that will satisfy others regarding this corruption, the individual who knows the truth will still have discernment by the grace of God to see that there is something wrong that needs to be resolved.

    God truly has preserved His Word, just not the way I originally believed or learned He did. Thanks always to the Lord for His long-suffering and patience as well as His compassion and truth that clears away the smoke of wickedness that veils our eyes from the light of His truth.
    (And no I do not believe in gnosticism, agnosticism, deism, or the like. Having the Lord as a guide, when having read their texts and found them to be utterly false.)

    Have a wonderful day all Brothers and Sisters and let us glorify God in all things.

    Like

    • Wow, Ryan. Thanks for all of that. I meant to respond a lot sooner, but you have so much in there, and I wasn’t sure where to start. Maybe I don’t need to say anything. You’d said enough for both of us. I’ll just say that I’m glad my blogs have resonated with you, and encouraged you. And I’m glad you found some resolution to your struggles with Scripture and the Church. Not easy!

      Not sure if you got around to reading Taming of the Shrewd (on of my posts), but the concept of that post is what I would want to respond to what you have said here. Nothing has settled me more than to put all of my confidence in the indwelling Holy Spirit. Not the Church (although I enjoy fellowship and worship and seeking truth with other believers). Not the Bible (I just don’t trust my own mind far enough). But in the Spirit. And through the Spirit, I enjoy fellowship in the Church and a wonderful experience in searching in the Scripture. He makes it alive and pertinent, and can guide my life and thinking in such a complicated world.

      Thanks for the encouragement!

      (and you can call me John)

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      • Thanks for the reply, John. I just call everyone “Mr. or Mrs/Ms.” unless asked otherwise.

        I also went ahead and read the “Taming of the Shrew” post as you suggested and can completely relate and agree. I definitely had a similar moment and continue to have such moments.

        Also, thanks so much again for sharing your thoughts. I think the biggest struggle I am in right now is knowing where the line is between being patient/loving and compromising truth.

        I was wondering what your thoughts about sharing the Gospel are in light of what you wrote in the “Shrew” post.

        Basically, I’ve got into so many arguements at first, that I stopped sharing the things the Holy Spirit was both teaching and disciplining me in, with the people in my immediate circle, such as at church, for a while now.

        It kinda came to a weird head last week when I was visiting a pastor’s family for dinner as they wanted to know how I was doing. This Pastor got unjustly framed for something that to this day both of us don’t understand, and ended up having to move another church. We had continued to maintain a good relationship.
        Anyways his wife mentioned that even though we have not know each other for too long, she thought I needed to stop being afraid of what people think and just start doing what God is telling me to and that is to “teach”. I was a bit shocked and when I asked why she thought I could teach. She mentioned that, “Ryan, I can tell you know ‘something’ that many people your age don’t. And whenever a conversation seems to head toward that ‘something’ you always skirt around the issue or just not participate in the conversation.” She picked up that I was deliberatly holding back.

        I responded that I knew this and was surprised that she and her husband had caught this. But that I was just not sure as I don’t think I am a good teacher as I have often got into arguements and everyone seems to say I just make them feel guilty. I am the first to admit that I still need to work on explaining things better and not letting emotions get a hold, but sometimes I just feel people don’t want the boat rocked, so I just am not sure what to do?

        Just been praying to find a balance.

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    • Ryan,

      I wish we could actually sit down and talk at length. It would be much easier than communicating this way. But I definitely resonate with what you’re saying, and can tell you that finding and responding to the Spirit’s voice will be a lifelong adventure, and worth all of the mistakes and growing pains.

      Ultimately, your zeal for truth will be tempered by a compassion for the hearts and minds of the people you are trying to convince, but that can only come as the Lord shares his own heart and mind with you. And teaching is a gift that develops over time as well, but it involves many long hours of prayer, study and research, but you will love every minute of is, especially when the Spirit begins to show you more and more, making connections that you didn’t know where there, expanding your understanding of our living and active Gospel.

      We need more people that can engage with culture in a rational and compassionate way, without compromise. People like Keith Green. Do you know about Keith? You might find a kindred spirit there. He was a Christian musician that died in a plane crash in the ’80’s, but his wife wrote about his life in a book called No Compromise. His life has always been inspiring to me.

      Like

      • Hi John,

        Sorry it took so long to reply. I have been sick and my head spinning and did not want to reply before I could really sit down and read through your reply with my head feeling like it was on forward instead upside down.

        I had not heard of Keith Green until you mentioned him and am looking into his books at the moment.

        Really appreciate your thoughts and help. God’s really been helping me to keep on pushing for that balance of zeal and compassion as you mentioned.

        What is probably the most difficult thing that I am praying about is if I end up in a situation where people get upset or offended, was it because I was too prideful, or could of explained it better, but my lack of understanding and love became a stumbling block as Paul talks about? Or is it like a Jerimiah situation where people were offended because it went against the cultural metality, but in the end, I really do not to feel bad about it.

        Ultimately, I don’t want to make others feel bad, but knowing how upset I used to get when others rebuked me, I know that it is not just about being politically correct since in the end even though I might have acted like those who had rebuked me were narrow-minded, at the time, I know now that the narrow way is the right way and whether they had everything figured out or not, they were still trying to do their best to present truth. And the whole, “well do you think that you only know God? Your just a Pharisee!” type response that I gave was completely wrong.

        It’s just that if someone says that to me now, I always feel that their is some truth to it. I am not perfect, I make so many mistakes all the time. Does that mean I should not say anything since I am not fully able to “walk the walk yet”?

        Anyways thanks again for your support and thoughts, John. Also apologies again it took a week to respond.

        Like

      • Hi John,

        Sorry it took so long to reply. I have been sick and my head spinning and did not want to reply before I could really sit down and read through your reply with my head feeling like it was on forward instead upside down.

        I had not heard of Keith Green until you mentioned him and am looking into his books at the moment.

        Really appreciate your thoughts and help. God’s really been helping me to keep on pushing for that balance of zeal and compassion as you mentioned.

        What is probably the most difficult thing that I am praying about is if I end up in a situation where people get upset or offended, was it because I was too prideful, or could of explained it better, but my lack of understanding and love became a stumbling block as Paul talks about? Or is it like a Jerimiah situation where people were offended because it went against the cultural metality, but in the end, I really do not to feel bad about it.

        Ultimately, I don’t want to make others feel bad, but knowing how upset I used to get when others rebuked me, I know that it is not just about being politically correct since in the end even though I might have acted like those who had rebuked me were narrow-minded, at the time, I know now that the narrow way is the right way and whether they had everything figured out or not, they were still trying to do their best to present truth. And the whole, “well do you think that you only know God? Your just a Pharisee!” type response that I gave was completely wrong.

        It’s just that if someone says that to me now, I always feel that their is some truth to it. I am not perfect, I make so many mistakes all the time. Does that mean I should not say anything since I am not fully able to “walk the walk yet”?

        Anyways thanks again for your support and thoughts, John. Also apologies again it took a week to respond.

        Like

      • Hey Ryan,

        Back in high school, I was known as a guy who was TOO outspoken about his faith, usually taking a negative, arrogant slant. I remember being defiant to my teachers when I believed they were wrong about some Biblical point or another. My 10th grade Bible teacher called me a “thorn in his side.” Ha!

        Anyway, I remember God really working with me on those points after college. When my wife and I went to a Bible school in England, I had an experience that really changed my understanding and approach. I remember talking to a couple of young men at a lunch table, trying to explain some spiritual point. They were absolutely enthused by what I was saying to them. Surprisingly so. We lingered at lunch until the cleaning people kicked us out, then we stood just outside the room and talked for another half hour or so.

        I thought we were the only two people standing in that open hall, but then someone asked a question behind me, and I turned around and saw that about 50 people had gathered and were listening in on the conversation. I remember being startled at the scene, but I knew the answer to the question. Another hand shot up, asking another hard question. For whatever reason, the answer would immediately come to mind and I would say it. Just as simple as, say, “What is 2 plus 2?” Your brain says 4, so you say “4.” But these were HARD questions, and many of the answers I had not known before.

        I realized after a while that the Holy Spirit was using me. We talked there in the hall until the dinner bell rang and I left for my room. I felt strange. I knew that people would be asking about the event, wanting more answers, but I didn’t know if I could continue giving them. It seemed like a fluke moment, one that could not be repeated. At dinner, people came to the table with more questions, asking if I could talk to some of their friends that were not able to be there. It was crazy.

        Anyway, this one girl took offense to one of my answers. She didn’t like that I said that God HAD to be loving, because that was the core of his nature. She argued that God could be or do anything he wanted. So we started a dialogue back and forth over the next few days. She would come with questions, and I would try to give her an answer. After about a week, she came to me angrily, and I tried my best to help her, and then she said something that has always stuck with me: “I keep coming after you, trying to prove you wrong, and you keep loving me back. I don’t want to do this any more.”

        After my reputation from high school and college, I knew that something had changed. It was the Lord. Not me. And that was the key. The Lord deals with people like a parent would deal with their child, always loving, always working toward that child’s best. A babysitter would just want to maintain peace and be right. I was starting to resonate with the heart of God, and that was changing my tone with people, and helping me choose my words and when to speak. It was (and continues to be) revolutionary.

        Not sure if that helps, but it has been a pretty big deal for me. And it challenges me every day to learn how to teach in the Spirit and not in my flesh through my brain, if that makes any sense.

        Like

      • Yes, that was very encouraging and helpful. Thank you. I guess the best corse of action would be to continue praying and searching for God’s insights, on how to live life according to His will. I suppose one factor is to really focus on improving my life in regards to the points the Holy Spirit is really helping and teaching me, and not worry so much about feeling like I should be going around sharing, now.

        If the Holy Spirit really does want me to teach, I would like to believe it will be obvious if the time comes. Otherwise, just continuing to trust in God and seek His will day by day, moment by moment.

        Really thankful to God that you were able to relate and share your experience. This has been on my chest for the last six months, but starting feel some relief.

        Thanks!

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      • Great! Thanks, Ryan.

        And I agree. The Lord will make your opportunities clear. In the meantime, just respond to what he’s doing inside of you. It will spill out naturally at the appropriate time.

        Like

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